Switch Communications Files Lawsuit against Vancouver Man

A Vancouver man who allegedly tried to sell a newly purchased domain name to an American communications is now being sued for allegedly violating the American Anti-cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act. According to the legal complaint, Dorian Banks purchased the switch.net domain through an auction in October and then tried to coerce Las Vegas-based Switch Communications into buying it from him. Switch says he was asking at least US $3,700.

According to reports, Banks allegedly contacted Switch to inform them he had the domain and offered to sell it to them. The company allegedly agreed to consider the offer and possibly begin negotiations, at which time they allege Banks threatened to contact some of the company’s competitors if they didn’t act quickly enough. According to lawsuit, he wanted them to open an escrow as a good-faith statement that they were willing to negotiate. Switch Communications then responded with their lawsuit.

According to Switch Communications’ law firm, Greenberg Traurig, Mr. Banks is allegedly guilty of “bad faith” in that he would have purposely purchased the “confusingly similar” domain name with the sole intent of manipulating Switch into rewarding him with a purchase. The law firm is asking for a restraining order which would prevent Banks from using the Switch name in any way, shape, or form. Furthermore, the lawsuit seeks to have the switch.net domain officially transferred to Switch Communications.

Switch Communications is an 11-year-old company specializing in telecommunications, interconnectivity, and Tier IV services for businesses throughout the world. They maintain a number of data centers and collocation facilities throughout the greater Las Vegas area, and recently announced plans to add an additional 1 million square feet of space in the future.

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